The Stewart Lairds of The Bu, Burray 1292 to 1756


Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland


Walter Stewart (1292–1327) a Scottish nobleman and knight, he was the 6th hereditary[a] High Steward of Scotland.[b] He was also the father of King Robert II of Scotland.


Biography

Walter was born in 1292.[2] He was the son of James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland and Gilles (or Egidia) de Burgh.[2] Walter was one of the Scottish leaders at the Battle of Bannockburn. Just before the battle began Walter along with his cousin James Douglas, Lord of Douglas were knighted by King Robert the Bruce a long with many others. Both he and James Douglas were both leaders of the left battalion in the battle.[3] He took part of all the Wars of Scottish Independence between Robert the Bruce and Edward II of England.[4]

The king sent Walter to bring home his wife Queen Elizabeth and daughter princess Marjory from Berwick. They had been held prisoner by the English for eight years.[5] Walter then married the princess Marjory.[5]

During the king's absence in Ireland the High Steward and Sir James Douglas managed government affairs and spent time defending the Scottish Borders. Upon the capture of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the English in 1318 he was placed in command of the town. On 24 July 1319 the town was attacked by King Edward II of England. Several of the siege engines were destroyed by the Scots' garrison and the Steward suddenly rushed in force from the town to drive off the enemy. In 1322, with Douglas and Thomas Randolph, he made an attempt to surprise the English King at Byland Abbey, near Malton, Yorkshire. Edward, however, escaped, pursued towards York by The Steward and 500 horsemen.

Walter, Steward of Scotland, made a charter to John St. Clair, his valet, of the lands of Maxton, Roxburghshire, circa 1320/1326, one of the witnesses being "Roberto de Lauwedir (Robert de Lauder) tunc justiciario Laudonie" (Justiciar of Lothian).[6]

Family and issue

Walter married, in 1315, Marjorie, only daughter of Robert I of Scotland by his first wife Isabella of Mar. The Lordship of Largs, taken from John Balliol, was given to Walter by Robert the Bruce, who also gave him the Farme Castle lands in Rutherglen as well as other lands and the barony of Bathgate, Linlithgowshire. Walter and Marjorie had one son:

Robert II of Scotland[2]

Walter later married Isabel de Graham, daughter of Sir John Graham of Abercorn and Mary of Strathearn. They had three children:

John Stewart of Ralston

Andrew Stewart[7]

Egidia Stewart. She married first, James Lindsay of Crawford. She married second Hugh Eglinton of Ardrossan and third to James Douglas of Dalkeith.[7]


Robert II of Scotland


Robert II (early 1316 - 19 April 1390) was King of Scotland from 1371 through 1390. He was the first king of the House of Stewart. He is known as Robert the Steward and succeeded the popular David II to the throne. He was crowned in 1371 and had 1 child, Robert III or "Robert the Lame" with Elizabeth Mure, he was mentally unstable and was born as John Stewart, he changed his name to Robert as he would be crowned John II recognizing John Balliol's claim as legitimate which would spark war.


Birth

He was born on 2 March 1316[1] in Paisley Abbey, Renfrewshire. He was the son of Walter Stewart and Marjorie Bruce. His mother died in childbith on 2 March and his father died 1326 and was buried in Paisley Abbey, where Robert II was born.

Reign

His reign began on 22 February 1371 upon his uncle's death (David II), he descended through Robert the Bruce and was crowned on March 26th of 1371. He wasn't a very popular king and died on 19 April 1390, he was succeeded by his son Robert III.[2]

Marriage

He had 2 wives during his lifetime, his first wife Elizabeth Mure and his second wife Euphemia de Ross.King Robert II had more children than any other King of Scotland, in all 15 by his two marriages.[3]

By Elizabeth he had:

1) John, Earl of Carrick (later ROBERT III) c.1340-1406

(2) Alexander, Earl of Buchan 'The Wolf of Badenoch' 1343-1394

(3) Margaret Stewart m. John Macdonald, Lord of the Isles

(4) Walter Stewart d. 1362

(5) Robert, Earl of Albany 1339-1420

(6) Marjorie Stewart m. (i) John Dunbar, Earl of Moray (ii) Alexander Keith

(7) Jean Stewart m. (i) Sir John Keith (ii) Sir John Lyon (iii) Sir James Sandilands

(8) Isabel Stewart m. (i) James Douglas, Earl of Douglas (ii) David Edmondstone

(9) Katherine Stewart

(10) Elizabeth Stewart m. sir Thomas Hay, Lord High Constable of Scotland

By Ephemia he had:

(11) David, Earl of Caithness d. before 1389

(12) Walter Stewart, Earl of Atholl d. 1437

(13) Margaret Stewart

(14) Elizabeth Stewart m. David Lindsay, Earl of Crawford

(15) Egidia Stewart m. Sir William Douglas of Nithsdale

Robert II also had 8 illegitimate children by various mothers[4]


Robert Stewart, Duke of Albany

Robert Stewart, Duke of Albany (c. 1340 – 3 September 1420) was a member of the Scottish royal family who served as regent (at least partially) to three different Scottish monarchs (Robert II, Robert III, and James I). A ruthless politician, Albany was widely regarded as having caused the murder of his nephew, the Duke of Rothesay, and brother to the future King James I of Scotland. James was held in captivity in England for eighteen years, during which time Albany served as regent in Scotland, king in all but name. He died in 1420 and was succeeded by his son, Murdoch Stewart, Duke of Albany, who was executed for treason when James returned to Scotland in 1425, almost causing the complete ruin of the Albany Stewarts.


Early life and ancestry

Robert Stewart was the third son of the future King Robert II of Scotland (1316–1390) and of Elizabeth Mure of Rowallan. His parents' marriage was deemed uncanonical at first, which in some circles, gave their children and descendants the label of illegitimacy, but the granting of a papal dispensation in 1349 saw their remarriage and their children's legitimisation. Robert's grandfather was Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland (1293–1326) and his father was the first monarch of the House of Stewart. His great-grandfather was Robert the Bruce (1274–1329), legendary victor of the Battle of Bannockburn.

Robert Stewart was raised in a large family with many siblings. His older brother John Stewart (1337–1406) became Earl of Carrick in 1368, and would later be crowned King of Scotland under the name Robert III.

In 1361 Stewart married Margaret Graham, Countess of Menteith (1334–1380), a wealthy divorcee who took Robert as her fourth husband. His sister-in-law's claim to the Earldoms of Menteith and Fife allowed him to assume those titles, becoming Earl of Menteith and Earl of Fife. In 1362 the couple had a son and heir, Murdoch Stewart, (1362–1425) who would in time inherit his father's titles and estates.

Stewart was responsible for the construction of Doune Castle, which remains largely intact today. When Stewart was created Earl of Menteith, he was granted the lands on which Doune Castle now stands. Building may have started any time after this, and the castle was at least partially complete in 1381, when a charter was sealed here.[1]

Politics and war

Scottish politics in the late fourteenth century was unstable and bloody, and much of Albany's career was spent acquiring territory, land and titles, often by violent means.[2]

During the reign of their infirm father as King Robert II (1371–1390), Robert Stewart and his older brother Lord Carrick functioned as regents of Scotland, kings in all but name, with Albany serving as High Chamberlain of Scotland. He also led several military expeditions and raids into the Kingdom of England. Fife ensured at the December 1388 council meeting that the guardianship of Scotland would pass from Carrick (who had recently been badly injured from a horse-kick) to Fife.[3][4][5] There was general approval of Fife's intention to properly resolve the situation of lawlessness in the north and in particular the activities of Alexander, Earl of Buchan, Lord of Badenoch and Ross, his younger brother.[4] Buchan was stripped of his position of Justiciar North of the Forth, which would soon be given to Fife's son, Murdoch Stewart. Father and son would now work together to expand their family interest, bringing them into violent confrontation with other members of the nobility such as Donald McDonald, 2nd Lord of the Isles.[2]

The Earl of Carrick acceded to the throne as King Robert III in 1390. His "sickness of the body" caused control of the kingdom eventually to devolve in 1399 to his son and heir apparent, David.[6] In 1398 David had been created Duke of Rothesay and Robert had been created Duke of Albany, the first two dukedoms created in the Scottish Peerage. Power had begun to shift away from Albany and towards his nephew.

Murder of the Duke of Rothesay

However, the English soon invaded Scotland, and serious differences emerged between Albany and Rothesay. In 1401, Rothesay was accused of unjustifiably appropriating sums from the customs of the burghs on the east coast and confiscating the revenues of the temporalities of the vacant bishopric of St Andrews.[7] Rothesay had also in conjunction with his uncle, Alexander Stewart, Earl of Buchan, confronted Albany's influence in central Scotland—as soon his lieutenancy expired in 1402 Albany acted swiftly and ruthlessly. Rothesay was arrested and imprisoned in Albany's Falkland Castle where he died in March 1402.[8] Rothesay's death probably lay with Albany and Douglas who would have looked upon the possibility of the young prince acceding to the throne with great apprehension. Albany certainly fell under suspicion but he was cleared of all blame by a general council, which found that 'by divine providence and not otherwise, it is discerned that he [Duke Rothesay] departed from this life.' [9][10]

However, even though Albany was exonerated from blame, suspicions of foul play persisted, suspicions which never left Rothesay's younger brother the future James I of Scotland, and which would eventually lead to the downfall of the Albany Stewarts. John Debrett, writing in 1805, was in no doubt of Duke Robert's motives and guilt:

"This Robert, Duke of Albany, having obtained the entire government from his brother, King Robert, he caused the Duke of Rothesay to be murdered, thinking to bring the Crown into his own family".[11]

After Rothesay's death, the King began to fear for his second son James, who fled Scotland for his own safety. Debrett continues:

"to avoid the like fate, King Robert resolved to send his younger son James, to France, then about nine years old, who being sea-sick, and forced to land on the English coast...was detained a captive in England eighteen years. At these misfortunes King Robert died of grief in 1406."[11]

After the death of his brother King Robert III, Albany ruled Scotland as regent. His young nephew, the future James I of Scotland, remained in exile and imprisonment in England for 18 years. Albany made little effort to secure the young Prince's ransom and return to Scotland, focusing his energies instead on securing his own power and interest.

Albany's political triumph did not settle his differences with the other members of the nobility, in particular Donald McDonald, 2nd Lord of the Isles, who in 1411 led an army of clansmen from the Northwest Highlands into open battle with the Stewarts. This conflict began when Albany had attempted to secure the Earldom of Ross for his second son John, despite McDonald's better claim.[12] At the Battle of Harlaw (known as "Red Harlaw" on account of its savagery)[13] on 24 July 1411, losses were heavy on both sides, though McDonald's eventual withdrawal allowed the Stewarts to claim a strategic victory.[14] The Stewart army was led by Albany's nephew, Alexander Stewart, Earl of Mar, who later sat on the jury of knights and peers which convicted Albany's son Murdoch Stewart, Duke of Albany and two of his sons of treason, virtually annihilating the Albany Stewarts.

Marriage and family

 

Stewart's son, John Stewart, 2nd Earl of Buchan, in a late-18th-century engraving. Buchan was killed at the Battle of Verneuil in 1424.

Albany married twice. Firstly, in 1361, he married Margaret Graham, Countess of Menteith, (1334–1380) a wealthy divorcee who took him as her fourth husband. His sister-in-law's claim to the Earldoms of Menteith and Fife allowed him to assume those titles after marriage. The couple had eight children, seven daughters and a son:

Lady Janet Stewart (married Sir David de Moubray)

Lady Mary Stewart (married Sir William Abernathy, 6th of Saltoun)

Lady Margaret Stewart (married to Sir John Swinton, 14th of that Ilk)

Lady Joan Stewart (married Sir Robert Stewart, 1st Lord of Lorne and had descendants)

Lady Beatrice Stewart (married Sir James Douglas of Balveny)

Lady Isobel Stewart (married to Alexander Leslie, 7th Earl of Ross and later to Walter de Haliburton, 1st Lord Haliburton of Dirleton and had descendants)

Murdoch Stewart, Duke of Albany (1362–1425) (Married Joan Douglas and later to Isabel, Countess of Lennox).

Lady Margery (married Sir Duncan Campbell, 1st Lord Campbell and had descendants)

Margaret died in 1380 and Albany subsequently married Muriella Keith, with whom he had three children:

John Stewart, 2nd Earl of Buchan (1381–1424); he fought in France against the English during the Hundred Years War, serving with distinction, but was killed at the Battle of Verneuil on 17 August 1424.

Robert Stewart, Earl of Ross, died without issue

Lady Elizabeth Stewart (married to Malcolm Fleming, ancestor of Malcolm Fleming, 3rd Lord Fleming)

Death and legacy

 The Duke of Albany died in 1420 in Stirling Castle and lies buried in Dunfermline Abbey in Fife. He was succeeded as Duke of Albany and Regent of Scotland by his son, Murdoch Stewart, Duke of Albany. But Murdoch would not enjoy his power for long. In 1425 the exiled King James, captive in England for 18 years, finally returned to Scotland, and executed Murdoch and most of his family for treason, causing the almost complete ruin of the Albany Stewarts.[2][15]

Murdoch Stewart's sole surviving male heir was his youngest son, James the Fat, who fled to Ireland after a brief rebellion against the King over the arrest of his father and brothers. James remained in Ireland, unable to return, and died there in 1429. He was never able to inherit his father's titles, since they had been declared forfeit.

Albany's great-grandson, James "Beg" Stewart, (c. 1410-1470) would eventually secure a pardon from the King and return to Scotland, though the family would never recover their lost estates. James "Beg" Stewart is the ancestor of the Stewarts of Ardvorlich on Lochearnside, whose family history is recounted by Sir Walter Scott in A Legend of Montrose.[16]

Murdoch Stewart, Duke of Albany

Murdoch Stewart, Duke of Albany (Scottish Gaelic: Muireadhach Stiubhart) (1362 – 24 May 1425) was a leading Scottish nobleman, the son of Robert Stewart, Duke of Albany and the grandson of King Robert II of Scotland, who founded the Stewart dynasty. In 1389, he became Justiciar North of the Forth. In 1402, he was captured at the Battle of Homildon Hill and would spend 12 years in captivity in England.

After his father died in 1420, and while the future King James I of Scotland was himself held captive in England, Stewart served as Governor of Scotland until 1424, when James was finally ransomed and returned to Scotland. However, in 1425, soon after James's coronation, Stewart was arrested, found guilty of treason, and executed, along with two of his sons. His only surviving heir was James the Fat, who escaped to Antrim, Ireland, where he died in 1429. Stewart's wife Isabella of Lennox survived the destruction of her family. She lived to see the assassination of James I and the restoration of her title and estates.


Early life

Stewart was born in 1362, the only son of Robert Stewart, Duke of Albany (1340–1420) and his wife Margaret Graham, Countess of Menteith. Duke Robert was a leading Scottish nobleman who was Regent of Scotland at various stages during the reigns of three kings, (Robert II, Robert III, and James I). In addition, Duke Robert held the titles of Earl of Menteith (28 February 1361), Earl of Fife (1361; resigned in 1372), Earl of Buchan (1394; resigned in 1406) and Earl of Atholl. In addition to exercising considerable power and wealth, the Albany Stewarts were potential heirs to the throne; Murdoch's grandfather was King Robert II of Scotland, who was the first member of the Stewart dynasty to rule Scotland.

Murdoch Stewart was raised in a large family, having eight sisters:

Janet Stewart (married Sir David de Moubray)

Mary Stewart (married Sir William Abernathy, 6th of Saltoun)

Margaret Stewart (married to Sir John Swinton, 14th of that Ilk)

Joan Stewart (married Sir Robert Stewart, Lord of Lorn)

Beatrice Stewart (married Sir James Douglas, 7th Earl of Douglas)

Isabella (Isobel) Stewart (married to Alexander Leslie, 7th Earl of Ross and later to Walter de Haliburton, 1st Lord Haliburton of Dirleton)

Lady Marjorie Stewart (married to Sir Duncan Campbell, 1st Lord Campbell)

Lady Elizabeth Stewart (married to Malcolm Fleming, ancestor of Malcolm Fleming, 3rd Lord Fleming)

His mother Margaret died in 1380. His father Duke Robert married a second time, to Muriella de Keith, with whom he had four children, the elder of whom was John Stewart, 2nd Earl of Buchan (1381–1424).

In 1389, at around age 27, Murdoch was appointed Justiciar North of the Forth. Father and son would now work together to expand their family interest, bringing them into violent confrontation with other members of the nobility, such as Donald McDonald, 2nd Lord of the Isles.[1]

War and capture

Stewart served in Scottish military actions against the English in the early 15th century and was captured at the Battle of Homildon Hill, which took place on 14 September 1402 in Northumberland, England. Led by Archibald Douglas, 4th Earl of Douglas, the Scottish army had invaded England bent on plunder, in part to avenge the killing and capture of Scottish nobles in the Battle of Nesbit Moor on 22 June 1402.[2] While returning to Scotland, they were intercepted by English forces led by Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland. The result was a decisive defeat of the Scottish army.

William Shakespeare later wrote, in his play Henry IV, part 1:

Ten thousand bold Scots, two and twenty knights,
Balk’d in their own blood did Sir Walter see
On Holmedon’s plains. Of prisoners, Hotspur took
Mordake the Earl of Fife, and eldest son
To beaten Douglas; and the Earl of Athol,
Of Murray, Angus, and Menteith:
And is not this an honourable spoil?
A gallant prize? ha, cousin, is it not? ---Shakespeare, Henry IV, part 1, act 1, scene 1.

Murdoch Stewart (described above as "Mordake the Earl of Fife") was held as a prisoner in England for the next twelve years.

Politics

Murdoch Stewart's captivity in England did not prevent his father from ruthlessly pursuing the family interest, often through violent means. On 26 March 1402 the Duke of Albany's nephew, David Stewart, Duke of Rothesay, had died in Falkland Palace while under his uncle's protection. King Robert III of Scotland, fearful that his younger son Prince James, the heir to the throne of Scotland, would suffer the same fate, sent him out of the kingdom to escape Albany's clutches. In 1406 James boarded the Maryenknyght, a ship from Danzig that was bound for France,[3] but on 22 March 1406, the ship was taken by English pirates off Flamborough Head and James was delivered as a prisoner to King Henry IV of England. Soon afterwards, on 4 April 1406 King Robert III died, leaving Scotland without a King.[4] Prince James, now the heir to the throne of Scotland and just 12 years old, would endure 18 years of detention in England. In his absence the Albany Stewarts took the reins of power, and Murdoch's father, Robert Stewart, Duke of Albany, became Governor of Scotland, king in all but name. The English price of returning James to Scotland was English overlordship of Scotland, something that few Scots were prepared to accept.

At this time Murdoch Stewart was still a prisoner in England, but in 1416 he was exchanged for Henry Percy, 2nd Earl of Northumberland, and he returned to Scotland. The Albany Stewarts took James's lands under their own control, depriving the king of income and any of the regalia of his position. James was referred to in the official records as merely 'the son of the late king'.[5]

Governor of Scotland and Duke of Albany

In 1420, on his father's death, Murdoch, now aged 58, finally inherited the Dukedom of Albany. He also inherited the Earldom of Fife and the Earldom of Menteith, and at last became Governor of Scotland in his own right. He would hold this position from 1420 to 1424, while King James I was still held captive in England. Few serious attempts appear to have been made by Duke Albany to return James to Scotland,[6] but eventually political pressure compelled Murdoch to agree to a general council.

Ransom and return of James I

The Battle of Verneuil, where Albany's brother John Stewart, Earl of Buchan was killed and his army destroyed.

In August 1423 it was agreed that an embassy should be sent to England to negotiate James's release.[7] A ransom treaty of 60,000 marks (an enormous sum) was agreed at Durham on 28 March 1424, to which James attached his own seal—he and his queen, accompanied by an escort of English and Scottish nobles, proceeded to Melrose Abbey, arriving on 5 April where he met Albany to receive the governor's seal of office.[8][9] Upon the return of James I to Scotland, Albany lost his position as Regent.

James began to consolidate his position. His coronation took place at Scone on 21 May 1424. At his coronation parliament the king—probably with the intent of securing a cohesive political community loyal to the crown—knighted 18 prominent nobles including Albany's son Alexander Stewart.[10]

At this stage, it is probable that the king felt unable to take action against the Albany Stewarts while Murdoch's brother, John Stewart, Earl of Buchan and Archibald Douglas, 4th Earl of Douglas were fighting the English in France alongside their Dauphinist French allies.[11] Buchan was a soldier with an international reputation, and commanded the large Scottish army of around 6,000 men, a formidable force. In addition he was Constable of France, making him the effective commander of the entire French army. However, both he and Douglas were killed at the Battle of Verneuil in August 1424 and the Scottish army was routed—the loss of these Albany allies with their fighting force left Murdoch politically exposed.[12] James moved swiftly against his Albany Stewart relatives soon afterwards.

Arrest

Murdoch was arrested, along with his younger son Lord Alexander Stewart. Albany was at first confined in the castle at St. Andrews and afterwards transferred to Caerlaverock Castle. His wife Isabella was captured in the family's fortified castle of Doune, their favourite residence, and committed to Tantallon Castle.

James's older brother David Stewart, Duke of Rothesay had died young, in Falkland Castle, while in the care of Murdoch's father, Robert Stewart, Duke of Albany. Though Albany had been exonerated by Parliament, the suspicion of foul play remained. Moreover, neither Duke Robert nor his son Murdoch had exerted themselves in negotiating James's release while in English captivity. This may well have left James with the suspicion that the Albany Stewarts had personal designs on the throne of Scotland.[13]

At this time Albany's other son Walter was already in prison. James, Murdoch's youngest son (also known as James the Fat), escaped arrest. and fled into the Lennox, where he began to organise a revolt, leading men of Lennox and Argyll in open rebellion against the crown. He attacked and burned the burgh of Dumbarton with much loss of life. This resort to violence by Albany's youngest son may spurred the king into bring a charge of treason against the Albany Stewarts, however, it is likely there was other evidence (no longer extant) for him to have gained the support of the leading magnates.[14]

Trial and execution

 Duke Murdoch, his sons Walter and Alexander, and Duncan, Earl of Lennox were in Stirling Castle for their trial on 18 May 1425, at a prorogued parliament in the presence of the King. An assize of seven earls and fourteen lesser nobles heard the evidence that linked the prisoners to the rebellion in the Lennox—in a trial lasting just one day the four men were found guilty of treason.

The jury which condemned them was composed of 21 knights and Peers, including Albany's half uncle Walter Stewart, Earl of Atholl, first cousin Alexander Stewart, Earl of Mar, first cousins once removed Archibald Douglas, 5th Earl of Douglas, and Alexander, Earl of Ross and Lord of the Isles.[15]

Walter was condemned on 24 May. Albany and his son Alexander were tried before the same jury the following day. All the prisoners were publicly beheaded on Heading Hill "in front of" Stirling Castle.[16][16][17][18] Albany was attainted and all of his peerage titles were forfeited. He was buried at Blackfriars' Church, Stirling.[19]

In the destruction of his close family, the Albany Stewarts, James I gained the substantial rents from the family's three forfeited earldoms of Fife, Menteith and Lennox, a blow from which the Albany Stewarts never recovered. More importantly, he secured his reign from the threat which had been constantly posed to him by the Albany Stewarts since his older brother's death, probably at their hands, decades before.[20]

Marriage and children

Murdoch was married to Isabella, daughter of Donnchadh, Earl of Lennox. They had four sons and a daughter:

Robert Stewart (d. 1421)

Walter Stewart (executed 1425)

Alexander Stewart (executed 1425)

James the Fat (Seamas Mòr) Stewart, fled to Ireland and died in 1429.[21]

Isabel, who married Sir Walter Buchanan, 12th Laird of Buchanan

Legacy

Albany's sole surviving male heir was his youngest son, James the Fat who, after his failed rebellion, escaped to Ireland following the execution of his father and brothers. James remained in Ireland, unable to return, and died there in 1429.[24] He was never able to inherit his father's titles, since they had been declared forfeit under the attainder. Albany's grandson, James "Beg" Stewart (c1410-1470), would eventually secure a pardon from the King and return to Scotland, though the family would never recover their lost estates. James "Beg" Stewart is the ancestor of the Stewarts of Ardvorlich on Lochearnside, whose family history is recounted by Sir Walter Scott in A Legend of Montrose.[25]

Albany's wife, Isabella of Lennox, survived the execution of her family, though she spent eight years as a royal prisoner at Tantallon Castle. In 1437, after the death of James I, she at last recovered her lands and title. In the next few years, although forced to govern her province from Loch Lomond, she issued a large number of charters and was tolerated by James's successor, King James II of Scotland, who allowed her to assume all her titles and honors as Duchess of Albany and Countess of Lennox.[26]


Walter Stewart, Master of Fife

Walter Stewart, Master of Fife was born between 1394 and 1410.1 He was the son of Murdoch Stewart, 2nd Duke of Albany and Isabel of Lennox, Countess of Lennox.2 He married, firstly, unknown daughter Campbell, daughter of Sir Duncan Campbell, 1st Lord Campbell and Lady Marjorie Stewart, in a unlawfully, presumably for want of a papal dispensation for consanguinity marriage.3 He and Lady Eupheme Graham were engaged on 5 September 1415 but the marriage did not take place.4 He married, secondly, Lady Janet Erskine, daughter of Sir Robert Erskine of that Ilk, 1st Lord Erskine and Lady Elizabeth Lindsay, on 24 April 1421, by Papal dispensation, although it is doubtful that this marriage was ever consummated.4 He died on 24 May 1425 at Castle Hill, Stirling, Stirlingshire, ScotlandG, beheaded, along with his father.2 He was buried at Church of the Black Friars, Stirling, Stirlingshire, ScotlandG.2
He was appointed Knight.2 He held the office of Keeper of Dunbarton Castle.1 In 1424 he was arrested and imprisoned on Bass Rock.3

Child of Walter Stewart, Master of Fife and Lady Janet Erskine

Walter Stewart, 1st of Morphie+2 b. b 1425, d. b 1488

Children of Walter Stewart, Master of Fife and unknown daughter Campbell

Andrew Stewart, 1st Lord of Avandale2 b. b 1425, d. Jul 1488

Alexander Stewart5 b. b 1425, d. c 1472

Children of Walter Stewart, Master of Fife

Sir Murdoch Stewart5 d. c 1472

Arthur Stewart2 b. b 1425, d. c 1488


Walter Stewart, 1st of Morphie

Walter Stewart, 1st of Morphie was born illegitimately, although he would be legitimate if truly a son of Janet Erskine before 1425.2 He was the son of Walter Stewart, Master of Fife and Lady Janet Erskine.1,2 He married Elizabeth Arnot.3 He died before 1488.
On 17 April 1479 he was legitimised.2

Children of Walter Stewart, 1st of Morphie and Elizabeth Arnot

Alexander Stewart+3 d. 1489

Elizabeth Stewart+4

ALEXANDER STEWART OF AVANDALE

Alexander Stewart was the son of Walter Stewart, 1st of Morphie and Elizabeth Arnot.1 He died in 1489.
He held the office of Lord Auditor in January 1488/89.1

Children of Alexander Stewart

Alexander Stewart

William Stewart

Andrew Stewart, 1st Lord Avandale+ b. bt Jan 1470 - 1488/89, d. 9 Sep 1513


Andrew Stewart,

Andrew Stewart, 1st Lord Avandale was born between January 1470 and 1488/89.1 He was the son of Alexander Stewart. He married Margaret Kennedy, daughter of John Kennedy, 2nd Lord Kennedy and Lady Elizabeth Gordon, before 4 February 1499/0.2 He died on 9 September 1513 at Flodden Field, Northumberland, EnglandG, killed in action.1
He was created 1st Lord Avandale [Scotland] on 4 February 1499/0.3 He held the office of First Usher of the King's Chamber between 1502 and 1509.4 He held the office of Lord Auditor in 1512.4 He fought in the Battle of Flodden on 9 September 1513.

Children of Andrew Stewart, 1st Lord Avandale and Margaret Kennedy

Andrew Stewart, 1st Lord Stewart of Ochiltree+4 d. 1548

Barbara Stuart+4

Alexander Stewart4

Agnes Stewart4

Anne Stewart+4

Henry Stewart, 1st Lord Methven+4 b. bt 1495 - 1500, d. a 10 Oct 1551

William Stewart, 1st of Dunduff+4 b. c 1500, d. 1552

Sir James Stewart of Beath+1 b. b 1513, d. 2 Jun 1544


Sir James Stewart 

Sir James Stewart of Beath was born before 1513.1 He was the son of Andrew Stewart, 1st Lord Avandale and Margaret Kennedy.1,2 He married Margaret Lindsay, daughter of John Lindsay, 3rd Lord Lindsay of the Byres and Marion Baillie, before 4 June 1533.1 He died on 2 June 1544 at Dunblance, ScotlandG, killed.1
He was Commendator of St. Colme's Inch.3 He held the office of Captain and Constable of Doune Castle in 1528.3 He held the office of Gentleman of the Bedchamber to King James V.3 He held the office of Steward of Menteith before 1538.3 He lived at Beath, ScotlandG.4

Children of Sir James Stewart of Beath and Margaret Lindsay

Elizabeth Stewart+3

Henry Stewart+3

Archibald Stewart3

Marjory Stewart+3

Margaret Stewart3

James Stewart, 1st Lord Doune+3 b. c 1529, d. 20 Jul 1590

Henry Stewart, of Buchlyvie

Henry Stewart is the son of Sir James Stewart of Beath and Margaret Lindsay.1 A contract for the marriage of Henry Stewart and Elizabeth Robertson was signed on 27 January 1566/67.1
He lived at Buchlyvie, Scotland.1

Children of Henry Stewart and Elizabeth Robertson

James Stewart of Burray+1

William Stewart1

Bernard Stewart1


James Stewart of Burray

James Stewart of Burray is the son of Henry Stewart and Elizabeth Robertson.2 He married Janet MacLeod, daughter of Torquill 'Dubh' MacLeod.2
He lived at Burray, Orkney Islands, Scotland.2

Child of James Stewart of Burray and Janet MacLeod

Barbara Stewart+1


Barbara Stewart, of Burray

Barbara Stewart is the daughter of James Stewart of Burray and Janet MacLeod.1,2 She married William Stewart of Burray, son of Sir Alexander Stewart, 6th of Garlies and Christian Douglas.1

Children of Barbara Stewart and William Stewart of Burray

Sir Archibald Stewart of Burray, 1st Bt.+1 d. 13 May 1689

Anna Stewart+3

John Stewart+4 b. c 1623, d. c 1691

Jean Stewart+1 b. 1623, d. 22 Oct 1662


Sir Archibald Stewart of Burray, 1st Baronet

Sir Archibald Stewart of Burray, 1st Bt. was the son of William Stewart of Burray and Barbara Stewart.1 He married, firstly, Isabel Moray, daughter of William Moray, 10th of Abercairny and Anne Hay.1 He married, secondly, Katherine Rowsay, daughter of Patrick Rowsay, on 16 September 1683.1 He died on 13 May 1689.1
He fought in the Battle of Worcester in 1651, where he was captured.1 He gained the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel in 1683 in the Orkney Militia.1 He was created 1st Baronet Stewart, of Burray [Nova Scotia] on 4 November 1687, with special remainder to his male heirs whatsoever.1

Child of Sir Archibald Stewart of Burray, 1st Bt. and Isabel Moray

Sir Archibald Stewart of Burray, 2nd Bt.+1 d. 1704


Sir Archibald Stewart of Burray, 2nd Baronet

Sir Archibald Stewart of Burray, 2nd Bt. was the son of Sir Archibald Stewart of Burray, 1st Bt. and Isabel Moray.1 He married Margaret Stuart, daughter of Hon. Archibald Stuart and Anna Henderson.1 He died in 1704.1
He succeeded as the 2nd Baronet Stewart, of Burray [N.S., 1687] on 13 May 1689.1 He held the office of Member of Parliament (M.P.) for Orkney and Shetland [Scotland] between 1702 and 1707.1

Child of Sir Archibald Stewart of Burray, 2nd Bt. and Margaret Stuart

Sir James Stewart of Burray, 3rd Bt.1 d. 24 Aug 1756


Sir James Stewart of Burray, 3rd Baronet


Sir James Stewart of Burray, 3rd Bt. was the son of Sir Archibald Stewart of Burray, 2nd Bt. and Margaret Stuart.2 He married Anne Carmichael, daughter of David Carmichael, 9th of Balmedie and Anna Graham.1 He died on 24 August 1756 at Southwark Prison, Southwark, London, EnglandG, under suspicion of high treason, without issue.2 
He succeeded as the 3rd Baronet Stewart, of Burray [N.S., 1687] in 1704.2